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  • The Bubble Economy Of Japan - 2,257 words
    The Bubble Economy of JapanThe Economy of Japan had experience a tremendous growth since the end of theKorean war. The growth of GNP in 1967 and 1968 was above 10 % (double digitgrowth period) which exceed countries such as Britain, France and Germany. Theeconomy experienced a boost is due to many reasons, such as: enlargement ofindustrial facilities, massive adaptation of western technology and education,lower the military expense to 1% of GNP, relation with power nation, humanresources and their spirit to achieve 'zero defect program'. But after the firstand second oil crisis that occur from 1973 onward. The economy move downwardspartially due to the poor management of economic policy. Alt ...
  • The Bubble Economy Of Japan - 2,142 words
    ... ral democractic did not receive 50 % of the seat throughelection. This percentage was the lowest since WWII and mainly was because thepopulations in Japan no longer believe the liberal democratic party can bringthem back from recession. Also they did not have a good control system duringthe bubble economy, failure of the recovery program after the bubblesplash.(program such as expansion in public investment, lowering the interestrate and series of economic counter measure but the yen is still pretty highwhich discourage export) In more specific, during the bubble economy thegovernment did not really propose an effective tax law until 1990. (NationalLand Value Tax- prohibitive tax on prof ...
  • Tom Clancys Op Center - 460 words
    Tom Clancy's Op-Center Divide and ConquerThe nation is about to be in another Middle East war, but they don't know it yet, even the president doesn't know it. Will Paul Hood inform the president with the correct information in time? Will war break out in Azerbaijan? In this political thriller you really don't know what is going on right up until the end. Paul Hood is the main character; he is the head of Op-Center, the United States division that deals with information sharing with Allis countries to stop terrorism. He is going through a divorce, and his daughter was just held hostage in an U.S. embassy (I think this happened in the book before the one I read). He had resigned from Op-Center ...
  • Transcendentalism And A Belief In A "higher Power" - 1,057 words
    Transcendentalism and A Belief In A 'Higher Power' We do not have good reasons to believe in something transcendental. Mostof the arguments in favor of God, or a so-called 'higher power' are based onfaith and emotion, and not a clear logical argument. In fact, these argumentsare often in favor of throwing logic out the window. In many ways, this questionis similar to someone attempting to prove the existence of an invisible elephant.It is far easier to prove that the elephant does not exist than it is to provethat it does. Socrates' principle of examination states that we must carefully examineall things. The tools we humans use to do this are logic and the scientificmethod. In order to beli ...
  • Theory Of Knwoledge - 813 words
    Theory Of Knowledge 'Don't give me any more facts! I need to make a decision right now!' Although one can question knowledge endlessly, one cannot forever suspend judgment while researching and reflecting. What would it mean to act responsibly in a situation where one cannot possess certainty? How would one justify the decision?Within all individuals, there is a basic necessity to obtain certain answers to questions, which is known as gumption. The satisfaction of this "gumption" in certain cases, becomes the basic factor of life needed to function. Hence, people often search for explanations to these uncertainties. This endless search will only lead to losing the truth. Gumption is the atte ...
  • Topivot - 579 words
    Perhaps no group has as much at stake in the debate over Social Security reform as African Americans. Elderly African Americans are much more likely than their white counterparts to be dependent on Social Security benefits for most or all of their retirement income. Yet Social Security benefits are inadequate to provide for the retirement needs of the elderly poor, which leaves nearly 30 percent of African-American seniors in poverty. As the debate over Social Security reform heats up, several questions have been raised that are of particular interest to the African-American community:. Is the current system fair to African Americans? . What is the best way to increase savings and wealth in ...
  • The American Association Of Retired Persons (aarp) - 1,691 words
    The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) Founded in 1958 by Dr. Ethel Percy, the American Association of RetiredPersons (AARP) has been dedicated to addressing the needs and interests of olderAmericans. Percy felt that older Americans could attain a sense ofsatisfaction and fulfillment by remaining physically and intellectually activein society, thus came about his idea to form the AARP. The AARP is a nonprofit,nonpartisan, membership organization open to anyone, working or retired, overthe age of 50. Based in Wash-ington, D.C., the AARP pursues its goals throughservice, advocacy, and education. The AARP's ultimate goal is to help olderAmericans achieve lives of independence, digni ...
  • The Risks Of Ligitation And Its Costs - 3,157 words
    REDUCING THE RISK OF LITIGATION AND LITIGATION COSTS IN THE UNITED STATES'Lawsuit, n. a machine which you go into as a pig and come out as a sausage.'Ambrose Bierce (1842--c 1914)Litigation is like coming down with the common cold. There are things we can do to lower the risks: we can take vitamins, wash our hands and stay out of drafts, but we can't altogether eliminate the prospect of catching one anyway, although if this should happen, we hope that because of our actions, it will be less severe. To reduce the risks of litigation or the costs of litigation when it occurs involves establishing constructive relations with your client, assessing its transactional partners and paying close att ...
  • The Risks Of Ligitation And Its Costs - 3,215 words
    ... general, to limit risks of employment related litigation, it is necessary to assume long-term administrative costs associated with maintaining detailed histories of actions taken with respect to the hiring, firing and promotion of employees. Whether a business has been consistent in dealing with an employee up to his or her termination or demotion is subject to considerable scrutiny in any litigation. Employees that have received superlative reviews only to be suddenly reprimanded for incompetence a year away from retirement and then terminated presents a situation that is likely to raise eye brows. Likewise of concern is the situation where an employee's job has been eliminated while a ...
  • The Prison Situation In The United States Is A Growing Problem - 921 words
    Why do we choose to break the law? It's socially accepted, most people break the law in a minor way, perhaps by speeding or J-walking. Unfortunately some people go to far and end up in prison. At that point society is divided, where is the line that separates us? What affects the outcome of what side of that line you are standing on? Education? Environment? Genetics? What would cause one subject to end up in prison while the other raises a family? Some researchers have concluded that it is in your genetic makeup. From the beginning of your life it's already decided if you will be a law respecting citizen. Though you can't deny the importance of the environment you were raised in. A majority ...
  • The Myth Of The Family - 574 words
    The Myth of the Model FamilyTHOSE OF US WHO grew up in the 1950s got an image of the American family that was not, shall we say, accurate. We were told, Father Knows Best, Leave It to Beaver, and Ozzie and Harriet were not just the way things were supposed to be-but the way things wereIt's probably good that life wasn't like the television shows in the '50s-we wouldn't have many women now. Take a look at the ratio of boys to girls on the most popular family shows. Ozzie and Harriet had two boys, no girls. Leave It to Beaver had two boys, no girls. Rifleman had one boy, one rifle, no girls. Lassie had one boy, one dog (supposedly a girl, but played by a boy), and no girls. My Three Sons had-w ...
  • To Kill A Mockingbird - 342 words
    Shannon WesterMay 1, 2005Mrs. TakeharaTo Kill A MockingbirdTo Kill A Mocking Bird In my diorama I depicted the scene of Jem walking Scout home from the Halloween pageant, in full ham-suit, when they are attacked in the woods by Bob Ewell. He first attacks Jem, and then Scout, until someone pulls him off of her, and Scout assumes it was Jem. The man who saved Scout and Jem was Boo Radley, the Finch's reclusive neighbor. He carries an unconscious Jem and scout back to their house, where Aunt Alexandra calls the doctor. Scout feared that Jem was dead, but he was only unconscious with a broken arm. When they find that Ewell was dead, Atticus tries vehemently to tell the sheriff that Jem killed h ...
  • The Declaration Of Independenc - 404 words
    By: John McCann There are many important factors in the Declaration of Independence, which enable the foundation of a new government. These range from describing grievances with England, to how government should be run differently, to the first statement of separation. The first step to the foundation of a new government is the uniting of a people in a common goal. Since all people were feeling violated by English soldiers, it was necessary to state these grievances in order to make people aware that they are not alone. When people learned that others felt the same as them emotion was stirred. The Declaration of Independence listed the grievances such as, "He has erected a multitude of new o ...
  • The Club - 1,064 words
    In The Club, friendship and loyalty are forgotten. The characters in this play sneak around behind each other's backs, trying to achieve one thing; they are trying to hold onto their position. They want to replace some members of the Club so that they can start a new and better club, without the interference of "busy-body's". Although Laurie shows loyalty to his team, and Ted shows loyalty to the club, Jock and Gerry are continually stabbing Laurie and Ted in the back. Gerry, the career administrator, seems to be on everybody's side but he is actually the one who makes the bullets for all the other bunnies to fire. Ted, the Club president, means well but can't help sticking his nose into oth ...
  • Tennis Made Easy - 402 words
    When surfing the Internet, eventually winding up at tennis4you.com, I found something called the "Lesson Lounge" which has instructional articles on the game of tennis. My particular article discusses a very crucial part of the game, and also a difficult one, the first serve. The reason this drew my attention is because this is a major weakness in my already pathetic tennis repertoire. By reading the article, I hoped to find strategy to learn from, and eventually, with practice, to improve from. In the article, they explain how the first serve can become "...someone's biggest weapon making someone else's worst nightmare!" That, not only can one use a power serve or a placement serve to attac ...
  • The Greatest Day - 1,044 words
    "Buzz" Aldrin, pilot of the Lunar module for the Apollo 11 space flight to the moon, coincided in his priest shortly before the launch of Apollo 11. Aldrin was scared that neither the Apollo 11 mission commander Neil Armstrong, nor the public would understand the social and philosophical ramifications of landing on the moon. Shortly after the Lunar Module landed at Tranquility base, on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969, Aldrin asked NASA officials and everyone else who might be listening to take a minute of personal prayer and contemplate what man had just accomplished. Aldrin then preformed he ritual of communion in the Lunar Module. Of a Fire on the Moon, a book surrounding the even ...
  • The Greatest Day - 1,045 words
    ... t the forefront of the world had been conceived during a time of war, only to kill. 6Again Mailer's observations raise a valid point about technology. The rockets developed by the Nazi's were the predecessors to the rockets developed for the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo Space missions. Large, multistage rockets were developed to carry large weapon payloads for the military in times of war. The rockets used to send Alan Shepard into space in 1960 were intercontinental ballistic missiles, or nuclear missile with out a nuclear warhead. The entire premise of Space flight and launching items into space derived from the idea of nuclear warfare. This is not to say that all technology involved in ...
  • The Awakening - 986 words
    Edna Pontellier's Struggle for Freedom in The Awakening by Kate ChopinIn Kate Chopin's novel The Awakening the constant boundaries and restrictions placed on Edna Pontellier by society will lead to her struggle for freedom and her ultimate suicide. Her husband Leonce Pontellier, the current women of society, and the Grand Isle make it evident that Edna is trapped in a patriarchal society. Despite these people, Edna has a need to be free and she is able to escape from the society that she despises. The sea, Robert Lebrun, and Mademoiselle Reisz serve as Edna's outlets from conformity. "Edna's journey for personal independence involves finding the words to express herself. She commits suicide ...
  • The Awakening - 1,009 words
    ... dy in its soft, close embrace (Chopin 13).The sea is a place that promises spiritual as well as physical freedom. The sea urges Edna toward limitlessness, toward transcendence, toward the romantic.Edna learns to swim-- a moment of complete liberation and discovery of her self, or at least a some facet of identity:But that night she was like the little tottering, stumbling, clutching child, who all of a sudden realizes its powers, and walks for the first time alone, boldly and with over-confidence. She could have shouted for joy. She did shout for joy, as with a sweeping stroke or two she lifted her body to the surface of the water (Chopin 27). Edna also sought refuge in other men as an e ...
  • The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Movie Review - 473 words
    'The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen'Despite Sean Connery and some impressive 19th century gloom, this big-screen translation of Alan Moore's culty comic-book series falls to earth with an incoherent splat.- - - - - - - - - - - -By Charles TaylorJuly 11, 2003 | In the opening scene of 'The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen,' a tank plows through the elegant Victorian interiors of the Bank of England. In short order, we see the destruction of an inn in Kenya, an enormous book-lined London sitting room, and the center of Venice, with the Basilica San Marco among the buildings reduced to rubble. This a destructo-thon for those with a taste for Old World elegance. There's no reason why 'The Le ...

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