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  • The Effects Of Catholicism On The Education Of Women In Renaissance Italy - 2,053 words
    The effects of Catholicism on the education of women in Renaissance ItalyBy Lenia ConstantinouAccording to Paul Grendler, the conservative, clerical pedagogical theorist Silvio Antoniano (1540-1603) reflected on women's educational status in Renaissance Italy in one of his written works, claiming that "...a girl (should not) learn 'pleading and writing poetry'; the vain sex must not reach too high...A girl should attend to sewing, cooking, and other female activities, leaving to men what was theirs". Apparently, this was the common-held view concerning women's education during that time. Although women were actually encouraged to literacy, their subservient social role as wives and mothers c ...
  • The Effects Of Catholicism On The Education Of Women In Renaissance Italy - 2,097 words
    ... they read for recognition and then for understanding. Their learning was in the form of a progressive series of steps: "alphabet, syllables, text without meaning, text with meaning and possibly by memory". Books used for elementary teaching were arranged in such a way as to accomodate this method of instruction. First, they presented the alphabet so that students would learn to recognize letters. Secondly, students were taught how to pronounce syllables. Finally, they managed to read the text, again for recognition and pronounciation purposes and eventually they learned to identify the meaning of the text. They ultimately moved on to "silent reading", which indicated a high level of und ...
  • Two Case Studies For Police Officers - 1,462 words
    In life there are a lot of issues that involve social psychology. Being a police officer is a profession that encounters a lot of social psychology issues. One issue that all police officers have to encounter is prejudice. Police officers have to not be prejudiced against the citizens that they are trying to protect and serve the criminals that they must apprehend and also against each other. Two case studies that will be discussed are prejudice against female police officers by their male counterparts and racial prejudice against potential criminals. You're a female cop. You arrive to your precinct fifteen minutes before you scheduled time to prepare yourself for the day, and you patiently ...
  • Two Case Studies For Police Officers - 1,457 words
    ... eat mean at a local diner, where you watched a football game and your favorite team won. After leaving the dinner you see an elderly woman lying on the ground surrounded by spectators. As you arrive at the scene, you notice that no one has called for help or done anything to revive the woman. Everyone is just sort of standing around, talking and looking at each other, saying that someone should help her. You check the woman's pulse and tell one of the bystanders to call for help. You take off your jacket and put it under her head for support. You as the some of the bystanders what happened and they reply that the woman had been mugged by a young Hispanic male. Your partner sees a young H ...
  • Tempest - 1,477 words
    The Tempest According to Elizabethan beliefs an individual's social position was more or less fixed. The King was King as he had been given a mandate by God, and all positions below this were based on a rigid social hierarchy, which were also dictated by birth.This ideology was decidedly conservative and used politically as a means of social control: forcing people with less status to internalise their inferiority and subservience, assuming it part of the natural order of the universe. Any rebellion, personal or collective, was therefore seen as an act of defiance not only against the State but God. This can be seen as a highly effective means of keeping order and perpetuating the power stru ...
  • The Day I Left Vietnam - 488 words
    KienCuong Nguyen I still remember that day; it was July 4, 1994. Myfamily including my parents, my three younger sisters, and I were goingto leave Vietnam to come to the United States. We had permission from theUnited States government to come over to the United States because my fatherused to work for the United States Army during the Vietnam war. I wokeup about eight o'clock in the morning. After breakfast, I dressed up andwalked around to say good-bye to my neighborhood. Some of my neighborswished me a good life and a better education, some told me keep in touchwith them. Then I went back to my house. It was full of relatives and friends.They came to visit us for the last time and some of ...
  • The Society Of The Spectacle - 1,104 words
    For decades, Guy Debord's The Society of the Spectacle was only available in English in a so-called "pirate" edition published by Black & Red, and its informative-perhaps essential-critique of modern society languished in the sort of obscurity familiar to political radicals and the avant-garde. Originally published in France in 1967, it rarely receives more than passing mention in some of the fields most heavily influenced by its ideas-media studies, social theory, economics, and political science. A new translation by Donald Nicholson-Smith issued by Zone Books last year, however, may finally bring about some well-deserved recognition to the recently-deceased Debord. Society of the Spectacl ...
  • The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn - 830 words
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is, not and should not, be considered a child's story. A story like this may corrupt a young child's mind. It deals with adult themes and concepts that are generally not suitable for young children. Als o, if used as a child's story it may confuse them or give them the wrong idea about slavery and the terminology of the time. First of all, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is extremely inappropriate for children because it may put bad ideas into a young impressionable mind. At the young age of about twelve, Huck is roaming around the woods all by himself and later on is flo ating aimlessly down the Mississippi River with a bunch of criminals. ...
  • The Merchant Of Venice - 313 words
    The Merchant of Venice does portray a prejudiced message. This is first evident in Act one when Shylock openly says to himself, "I hate him because he is a Christian....May my people be cursed if I forgive him!" All throughout the book the Christians are battling with the Jews and neither of them will listen to the other because their hearts are filled with intense prejudice. Antonio proves that he is unwilling to change his feelings toward Shylock when he says, "I'm likely to call you names again, spit on you again, and shun you again." They don't seem to realize that their prejudiced attitudes could get someone (Antonio) killed. There are different times during the play that Shylock could ...
  • The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie - 1,922 words
    Muriel Spark's The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie depicts the coming of age of six adolescent girls in Edinburgh, Scotland during the 1930's. The story brings us into the classroom of Miss Jean Brodie, a fascist school teacher at the Marcia Blaine School for Girls, and gives close encounter with the social and political climate in Europe during the era surrounding the second World War. Spark's novel is a narrative relating to us the complexities of politics and of social conformity, as well as of non- conformity. Through looking at the Brodie set and the reciprocities between these students and their teacher, the writer, in this novel, reviews the essence of group dynamics and brings in to focus ...
  • The Life Of Emily Dickens - 1,124 words
    The Life of Emily DickensEmily Dickinson was raised in a traditional New England home in the mid 1800's. Her father along with the rest of the family had become Christians and she alone decided to rebel against that and reject the Church. She like many of her contemporaries had rejected the traditional views in life and adopted the new transcendental outlook. Massachusetts, the state where Emily was born and raised in, before the transcendental period was the epicenter of religious practice. Founded by the puritans, the feeling of the avenging had never left the people. After all of the "Great Awakenings" and religious revivals the people of New England began to question the old ways. What u ...
  • The Nature Of The Mind - 444 words
    A leading exponent of the substantial view was George Berkeley, an 18th century Anglican bishop and philosopher. Berkeley argued that there is no such thing as matter and what humans see as the material world is nothing but an idea in God's mind, and that therefore the human mind is purely a manifestation of the soul. Few philosophers take an extreme view today, but the view that the human mind is of a nature or essence somehow different from, and higher than, the mere operations of the brain, continues to be widely held.Berkeley's views were attacked, and in the eyes of many demolished, by T.H. Huxley, a 19th century biologist and disciple of Charles Darwin, who agreed that the phenomena of ...
  • The Civil Rights Movement - 1,163 words
    The Civil Rights Movement Civil rights are the rights to personal liberty and are provided by the law. The Constitution and the Bill of Rights promises everybody civil rights. But many people, including lots of black people, have been denied their civil rights. Black people, and also some white people who help them, have struggled for these rights for a long time. Many people have helped and many kinds of groups have been formed to help win equal rights for everyone. Things are a lot better used to be, but the struggle is not over. Soon after the Declaration of Independence was signed there were groups that tried to end slavery. They were in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Rhode Island, Delaware, Ne ...
  • The Weary Blues And Lenox Avenue: Midnight - 381 words
    "The Weary Blues" and "Lenox Avenue: Midnight" by Langston Hughes are two poems written as scenes of urban life. Although these poems were written more than seventy years ago, it is surprising to see some general similarities they share with modern day city life. Dilluted down with word play and irrelevant lines such as "And the gods are laughing at us.", the underlying theme is evidently urban life. "The Weary Blues" and "Lenox Avenue: Midnight" approach the general topic of urban life from two different aspects also. "The Weary Blues" speaks of a person hearing a Negro playing the blues on a piano "Down on Lenox Avenue the other night,". The poem is centered around this event, explaining " ...
  • The Grapes Of Wrath - 1,131 words
    ... d Jesus, he battles with hisfaith throughout The Grapes of Wrath. He feels like he iscontending with the very ideals he has spread to others-traditional ideals of God and Jesus. Casy started to questionhis own beliefs and what was said in the Bible. Casy lostmany hours of sleep just thinking about this, and wentthrough many days without even speaking. He began to havedoubts about God, Jesus, and about the afterlife altogether.He went from a man of God to a man of everyone. Casyonce said,'An I says, 'Don't you love Jesus?' Well, I thoughtan' thought an' finally I says, 'No, I don't know nobodyname' Jesus. I know a bunch of stories, but I only lovepeople.' ' After Casy challenged his inner ...
  • The Sonnet Form And Its Meaning: Shakespeares Sonnet 65 - 1,846 words
    The Sonnet Form and its Meaning: Shakespeare Sonnet 65 The sonnet, being one of the most traditional and recognized forms of poetry, has been used and altered in many time periods by writers to convey different messages to the audience. The strict constraints of the form have often been used to parallel the subject in the poem. Many times, the first three quatrains introduce the subject and build on one another, showing progression in the poem. The final couplet brings closure to the poem by bringing the main ideas together. On other occasions, the couplet makes a statement of irony or refutes the main idea with a counter statement. It leaves the reader with a last impression of what the aut ...
  • The Battle With Grendels Mother - 302 words
    The Battle With Grendel's Mother When Grendel's mother found Beowulf running around on her ground, she picked him up and took him to a high arched building with a large battleground. She clawed at his mail shirt, but it did not affect him. The mail shirt was too strong for her to penetrate her fierce claw through. They fought and wrestled for quite some time. They wore each other out, she would try to tear him apart, but the mail shirt stayed sturdy and strong. She bit holes in his helmet. When Beowulf realized that his weapons were useless, he threw down his sword and decided to try using his fists instead. He picked her up by the shoulders and knocked her to the floor. That still wasn't en ...
  • The Italian Lira - 320 words
    The Italian Lira is a fairly new currency with roots that lie deep within Italian culture. The word 'lira' is actually derived from the Latin word 'libra', meaning pound, making it a distant cousin to that of the British pound sterling. The lira was a monetary unit long before it existed as a coin or note. The lira made its first appearance in the hands of bankers, merchants and consumers in Venice in 1472, put in place by Doge Nicolas Tron. The Venice lira set a trend for large silver coins with enough space to bear the local ruler's portrait. These were called testone in Italy, from the word testa meaning head, teston in France, and testoon in Britain, where the first example was a shillin ...
  • The Summary Of The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,198 words
    The Narrator had received a letter from a boyhood acquaintance, Roderick Usher, begging that he come to him 'posthaste.' Usher had written to explain that he was suffering from a terrible mental and bodily illness, and longed for the companionship of 'his only personal friend.' The plea seemed so heartfelt that the Narrator immediately set out for the Usher ancestral home. Approaching the ivy-covered, decaying old house, the Narrator was struck b y an overwhelming sense of gloom which seemed to envelop the estate. The very sight of the manor caused within him 'an illness, a sickening of the heart, an unredeemed dreariness.' But even though the'eye-like' windows of the mansion seemed to be st ...
  • The Reality Of Fast Food Meat - 1,599 words
    According to Eric Schlosser author of Fast Food Nation, 'Fast food has had an enormous impact not only on our eating habits but on our economy, our culture, and our values'(3). According to Lois Williams on any given day, about one quarter of U.S. adults visit a fast-food restaurant. The typical American now eats about three hamburgers each week (2). Schlosser also writes that "thirty years ago Americans spent about six billion dollars annually on fast food. In 2000 they spent over one-hundred and ten billion dollars, more than on higher education, personal computers, or new cars (3). The reality of fast food is regarding the spreading and feeding of illness and disease; as well as the inhum ...

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